Changes

Jump to: navigation, search

Talk:Videos/Digital Show and Tell

8 bytes removed, 07:51, 3 May 2014
m
Moved most recent post to the end + reformatted
Greetings, Feel free to comment here— just log in to edit— or join us on [http://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=xiph IRC chat].
 
 
Hi, I've got 3 questions, but first let me say thank you for the great explanations, I donate to Wikipedia and have also donated here. Great videos. On to the questions:
 
The 3 questions relate to Sample rate, Waveform Representation and the Frequencies (if you like) ADSR Envelope behaviour.
 
1)
 
If we record (or generate data raw from inside the computer) using a Super High Sample Rate, like 192kHz, we would be bandlimiting at a much higher frequency, thus capturing more harmonics, which would in turn, give us a far more accurate representation of the waveform inside the computer when we re-generate the waveform using the recorded samples. So when we have the interest of editing (or processing) the recorded waveform with a much higher level of detail, it is beneficial to use much higher sample rates. So since the higher the Sample Rate = the more accurate the Waveform, it does make sense to use as high a sample rate as possible (considering your resources for processing or storing data).
Would this entire statement be 100% accurate?
 
2)
 
About the ADSR (envelope) recoding of each Frequency. In short, would an increased Bit Depth produce a more accurate representation of each frequencies Attack, Decay, Sustain & Decay in Amplitude? Therefore, on the output, be better able to accurately represent transients (and what follows) with more accuracy?
 
3)
 
Another question relating to capturing ADSR behaviour of frequencies. I came across an idea online that in order to capture transients ADSR behaviour more accurately, you will need (at least) twice the Sample Rate of the Transients Sustain Rate, otherwise the Transient will be deformed slightly (therefore distorted) - The Transient would still be represented at the output, but because the voltage has "less" samples to go through, the Transient will be less accurately represented compared to what the original Input was. The more samples the voltage runs through smoothly, the more detailed the frequencies ADSR Amplitude behaviour is captured.
Is this statement 100% accurate?
 
 
--[[User:Electronic|Electronic]] 09:10, 03 May 2013 (PST)
 
The wiki version of the video isn't yet as complete as the last video, due to schedules and timelines. In particular I think it could use some more going-deeper coverage. I'm surprised that I couldn't better HTML5 audio api examples of the "type your own JS, get audio and a scope" kind, if anyone knows of a better one than the one we have now that would be great.
And another question: Audiophile "believers" will argue, that digital signals always have jitter. What type of noise is that? And how would you agure, that this does not matter?--[[User:Vietwoojagig|Vietwoojagig]] 04:30, 4 April 2014 (PDT)
 
Hi, I've got 3 questions, but first let me say thank you for the great explanations, I donate to Wikipedia and have also donated here. Great videos. On to the questions:
 
The 3 questions relate to Sample rate, Waveform Representation and the Frequencies (if you like) ADSR Envelope behaviour.
 
1) If we record (or generate data raw from inside the computer) using a Super High Sample Rate, like 192kHz, we would be bandlimiting at a much higher frequency, thus capturing more harmonics, which would in turn, give us a far more accurate representation of the waveform inside the computer when we re-generate the waveform using the recorded samples. So when we have the interest of editing (or processing) the recorded waveform with a much higher level of detail, it is beneficial to use much higher sample rates. So since the higher the Sample Rate = the more accurate the Waveform, it does make sense to use as high a sample rate as possible (considering your resources for processing or storing data). Would this entire statement be 100% accurate?
 
2) About the ADSR (envelope) recoding of each Frequency. In short, would an increased Bit Depth produce a more accurate representation of each frequencies Attack, Decay, Sustain & Decay in Amplitude? Therefore, on the output, be better able to accurately represent transients (and what follows) with more accuracy?
 
3) Another question relating to capturing ADSR behaviour of frequencies. I came across an idea online that in order to capture transients ADSR behaviour more accurately, you will need (at least) twice the Sample Rate of the Transients Sustain Rate, otherwise the Transient will be deformed slightly (therefore distorted) - The Transient would still be represented at the output, but because the voltage has "less" samples to go through, the Transient will be less accurately represented compared to what the original Input was. The more samples the voltage runs through smoothly, the more detailed the frequencies ADSR Amplitude behaviour is captured. Is this statement 100% accurate?
 
--[[User:Electronic|Electronic]] 09:10, 03 May 2013 (PST)

Navigation menu